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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
and large ideas. i'm no theologian, though i've written about religion, but i find them stimulating. i--i like being stimulated by those very large ideas, about the meaning of life and whether there is god and what is god, if there is god, and what is the relation of organized religion to morality. all of those questions tantalize me. c-span: jumping from your alcove one and that group way beyond to just a few years ago, you write about, at the american enterprise institute, having lunches every day with robert bork and nino scalia and laurence silberman and then jude wanniski. what was that all about? >> guest: well, i was--i had taken a leave of absence from my teaching at nyu, a sabbatical, to learn economics. i felt at that point, economics was becoming important. up until that point, i assumed that lor--john maynard keynes had said everything there was to say about economics. but once we got stagnation and inflation at the same time, it was quite clear that someone had to revise economics. and although i knew i couldn't do it myself, i--at least i wanted to understand what was goi
at religion first. we are talking about 23% of the evangelicals in colorado and only 2% mormon. the bottom line is can you take religion and does that directly correlate to votes? >> not only religion, but in the state of colorado, let's look at people there. they are fiercely independent. they maintain their strong values in their western traditions. if you look at the unemployment rate it is very high. mitt romney has momentum there. but if you look at the ballot initiatives -- >> one second. we will slow down. the unemployment high is not that high. it is 8%. i am just saying. >> exactly. >> we would like no one to be out of a job. >> exactly. >> you can't say it is very high. >> well, when the president says if you pass my jobs bill and my stimulus plan that unemployment would be 5.4%, arthel, that's high. to get back to what i sac weighing about the ballot initiatives, if you look at the initiatives that would push them and dealing with increasing government spending and increasing taxes. that goes to mitt romney's platform. >> all right. ryan, let me talk to you right now. we know th
to it. i think that relation, not just the catholic church, but faith and religion are misrepresented in the major media. first of all, you can present your own opinion on fact, as fact, because why? as long as you're talking about religion, religion is totally subjective and the not based on any truth, no matter what you say, it's okay. what's an example of that? this last week, bill collar of the new york times wrote an article how to die, it was all about end of life care. the suggestions he made was that the reason we're not able to, as a society, get to a point in which our loved ones can die peacefully is because the catholic church would never allow such practices to occur. meaning what? a suggestion that the catholic church would require a family member to go to extreme means to keep somebody who is dying alive. it's simply not the truth. but, nobody stands up to it because you know what? as long as you're talking about religion, as long as you can offer any opinion you want and pass it as fact because religion itself is purely subjective. >> clayton: what about during the vic
interference, without pressure, without political interference. that's their role in that religion. in iran, they see a challenge to the legitimacy of the oversight of that. it's a governance issue. it's not a sunni shia issue. and with iran's government, d.c. essentially death by 1000 razor cuts as iran has a coherent strategy for destabilization in the region, starting in baghdad, extends to damascus. hamas, muslim brotherhood and yemen, bahrain, the eastern province, wherever they can take an issue and turn it into a sectarian issue, that is the strategy that they see that iran is pursuing. so he ran as a very real threat to them. it's the existential threat in the region. >> thank you, mr. ambassador for enlightening us in this opening session of the second day of his 21st annual comp trends of u.s. policy issues. [applause] >> next we have a relative newcomer to the annual forums in the sands of the new league of arab states chief representative ambassador to the united states. i've known each one of them for the last almost half-century and each one of them brings to the cars in the t
really looking at it as a common religion. they are quite far along. syria and iran share americanism and the anti-israeli attitude. they share a common front. the shia crescent is there. and the growing [inaudible] the crescent goes from libya through egypt through georgia and the western part of iran and saudi arabia and the coast. moving across saudi arabia. increasingly the joint of sectarian war. the optimism in syria is increasingly being joined by these extremists. it is one of the reasons for supporting bad, saudi arabia is providing small arms. and we have to ask ourselves, what kind of extremism is coming out of that? >> we also have a situation of that which is maintained by russia. again, that group -- it goes back again. all relationships between russia and syria. they are both against the security council and it has to do with a great power in war over there. there is the issue of what issue is that that they are actually supporting? i have a syrian contact that i talked to a couple of days and he said syria? we think of ourselves as [inaudible] , but we do not know what
he was born in a different country, like lots of other things that he said even questions on religion, i wonder -- if certain things were there, especially of course, born in a different place, then he said, which is a possibility, that would make the presidency a sham. i hope that we wouldn't find that. i would like to give the money and have those records be perfect. now, somebody said, you could offer a billion dollars and he wouldn't give the records because the records are so wrong and so terrible. i don't know that to be a fact. he has until wednesday at 5:00 o'clock to give his records. if he gives the records, $5 million to a charity of his choice. >> steve: donald trump, before you go, on a scale of one to ten what, are the odds that he'll do that before then? >> i don't want to say that. this is a serious offer. as i told you, it has tremendous momentum. you know when i was doing david letterman, one of the things he said, well, do you think he was born in this country? and i said, i really don't know. i can't answer that. i can't answer. that what about you you, i probably
or is the william cannon distinguished humanities professor. the religion complete guide to religious studies. check out. [applause] >> thank you, allison, and let me add my thanks to doctor anthony and his staff for another wonderful conference. we have done so much work and come together so well. and i would like to thank my colleagues who are very enlightening. i don't want to have too much overlap, but what i will do today is focused on palestine as a regional conflict. in 1990, the eyes of the world turn to the middle east and saddam hussein launched his disastrous invasion of kuwait. in 1991, the u.s. launched the gulf war. seeing that occupation of another country was illegal and had to be stopped. that was a principal. when palestinians insisted that the same principle should apply to them, policymakers and pundits are geared that there was no linkage. the link between the two conflicts. saddam had invaded kuwait, and that was intolerable. the palestinian and raise israeli conflict had a different story. the legality of occupation could be considered a principal come only if it was applied
recounts his life in fractalist. in of africa, africa's culture, religion, history and identity. look for these titles in bookstores this coming we can watch for the authors in the near future on booktv and on booktv.org. >> could have wanted more but in the conference can only do so much so want diversity. you want democrats, republicans, different parts of the country. everyone at different ages. we knew on the basis of nine, you can't make generalizations that are 100% certain. we may say as much in the book because conclusions are hypothesis that other people might run with but in order to make those hypotheses we needed a fairly diverse group. >> we also have the white house project for the last couple election cycles and several of the women identified several years before the 2008 election, kathleen sibelius, both in there, and barbara lee has been here several years from now when you did the last round with her foundation and talked about looking at women governors. we wanted to look at women governors who had been through barbara lee's training through the pipeline. we also m
about religion. if you have been going to church or synagogue or mosque or one year or 10 years or 25 years or 50 years waiting to know enough about god so you can swing into action i'm telling you that you already know enough. and you know deep in your heart that you know enough. you know what to do. jesus reminds us with every story, every parable, every teaching come every commandment we are to bring good news to the poor. we are to bring relief to the captors and let the oppressed go free and proclaim the year of the lord's favor. we are to feed the hungry and clothe the naked and we are to visit the sick and those in prison. i wonder, don't you? i wonder how many people in our great country are drowning in loneliness, hurtheard, sin doubt and despair or are unemployed and do not have health care or quality education while we who know what to do don't respond. [applause] [applause] just like jesus hometown synagogue and nazareth, every one of us every one of us of every faith tradition stands judged by our
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)